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Joining OSA

joining osa picture

supr 2015


Interested in joining OSA/SPIE? 

1. Subscribe to our mailing list to hear about all Stanford Optical Society news and upcoming events!

2. Like our facebook page to see pictures and keep up to date!

3. Become a member of the national societies here: OSA Membership and SPIE Membership

 

Membership Benefits:

As an OSA Student Member ($20), enjoy:

As a SPIE Student Member ($20), enjoy:

  • Discounts (e.g., reduced registration, 50% off conference courses) & special member events at conferences like Photonics West and Optics & Photonics

  • Free subscriptions: an online SPIE journal of your choice and SPIE Professional quarterly magazine

  • Access to SPIE's employment resources: SPIEWorks and career fairs at SPIE meetings

  • Eligibility for SPIE Scholarships and Grants

Optics Faculty

Name Research Field of Interest
Zhenan Bao polymer and organic electronics and photonics
Robert L. Byer solid state lasers, adaptive optics, nonlinear optics
Mark Brongersma photonic nanoparticles and nanostructures
Bianxiao Cui biomedical optics
Michel Digonnet fiber optics
Abbas El Gamal digital imaging and wireless networks
Audrey K. Bowden Point-of-Care Diagnostics, Optofluidics, Optical Coherence Tomography
Shanhui Fan photonic crystals, computational electromagnetics
Robert Feigelson nonlinear optical materials
Martin M. Fejer nonlinear optics, nonlinear optical materials, applications in telecommunications
James S. Harris semiconductor optoelectronic materials, devices and applications
Stephen E. Harris fundamentals of photonics and nonlinear optics
Lambertus Hesselink nano-photonics and ultra-high density optical data storage
Joseph M. Kahn Optical fiber communications, free-space optical communications, associated devices and subsystems
Mark Kasevich High accuracy navigation and gravimetric sensors based on de Broglie wave interferometry; Future atom optics sensors which exploit the novel coherence properties of Bose-Einstin condensates
Leonid Kazovsky optical telecommunications and network systems
Thomas W. Kenny microsensors based on silicon micromachining
Michael McGehee polymer optical materials and devices
David A. B. Miller optoelectronic physics, devices, and systems, optical switching and interconnects, optical sensing
W. E. Moerner single-molecule spectroscopy, biophysics, nanophotonics
Daniel Palanker Biomedical optics and electronics
Krishna Saraswat innovative materials, device structures, and process technology of silicon devices and integrated circuits
Mark Schnitzer design and application of micro-optical imaging techniques for studying biophysical dynamics of neurons
Anthony E. Siegman (Emeritus) Research and consulting in lasers, optics and fiber optics, including technical and litigation consulting
Olav Solgaard optical micromechanical devices and applications
Jelena Vuckovic photonic crystal-based optical and quantum optical devices and their integration; solid-state photonic quantum information systems; cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots
Brian A. Wandell image system engineering and visual neuroscience
Gordon Wetzstein display systems, computational imaging, and light transport
Yoshihisa Yamamoto fundamental optoelectronic physics, structures, and devices, quantum computing

 

w.e. moerner

steven chu

Gordon Wetzstein

 

Students_Fatih

Optics Courses

light

Stanford offers a wide variety of optics and photonics related courses in several different departments.  Below is a listing of these courses:

Seminars

APPPHYS 483. Optics and Electronics Seminar

Current research topics in lasers, quantum electronics, optics, and photonics by faculty, students, and invited speakers. May be repeated for credit.

1 unit, Aut, Win, Spr 

Undergraduate Courses

APPPHYS 68N. Lasers and Photons

(F,Sem) Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. The physics of lasers and their light. Computer applets and hands-on investigations. Historical development of ideas about light: electromagnetic waves; particles; special relativity; quantum theory; and the laser. Properties of laser light: wavelength and frequency; coherence; polarization; interference; diffraction; and linear and nonlinear optics. Lasers and applications from Schawlow and Townes to Linac Coherent Light Source. Prerequisites: high school physics and calculus. GER:DB-EngrAppSci

3 units, Aut (Bucksbaum, P)

EE 134. Introduction to Photonics

Photonics, optical sensors, and fiber optics. Conceptual and mathematical tools for design and analysis of optical communication and sensor systems. Experimental characterization of semiconductor lasers, optical fibers, photodetectors, receiver circuitry, fiber optic links, optical amplifiers, and optical sensors. Class project aimed on confocal microscopy for biomedical applications. Laboratory experiments. Prerequisite: 41 or equivalent. GER:DB-EngrAppSci

4 units, Spr (Ellerbee, A)

EE 136. Introduction to Nanophotonics and Nanostructures

Electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves and semiconductors. Confining these waves, and devices employing such confinement. Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires, and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisite: familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves and semiconductors at the level of EE 41 or equivalent. GER:DB-EngrAppSci

3 units, Spr (Vuckovic, J)

EE 141. Engineering Electromagnetics

Lumped versus distributed circuits. Transient response of transmission lines with resistive and reactive loads. Reflection, transmission, attenuation and dispersion. Steady-state waves on transmission lines. Standing wave ratio, impedance matching, and power flow. Coulomb's law, electrostatic field, potential and gradient, electric flux and Gauss's Law and divergence. Metallic conductors, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, capacitance, dielectric materials. Electrostatic energy and forces. Steady electric currents, Ohm's Law, Kirchoff's Laws, charge conservation and the continuity equation, Joule's Law. Biot-Savart's law and the static magnetic field. Ampere's Law and curl. Vector magnetic potential and magnetic dipole. Magnetic materials, forces and torques. Faraday's Law, magnetic energy, displacement current and Maxwell's equations. Uniform plane waves. Prerequisites: 102A, MATH 52.

3 units, Win (Vuckovic, J)

MATSCI 164. Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory

Lab course. Current electronic and photonic materials and devices. Device physics and micro-fabrication techniques. Students design, fabricate, and perform physical characterization on the devices they have fabricated. Established techniques and materials such as photolithography, metal evaporation, and Si technology; and novel ones such as soft lithography and organic semiconductors. Prerequisite: 152 or 199 or consent of instructor. GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WIM

3-4 units, Aut (Salleo, A)

MATSCI 195. Waves and Diffraction in Solids

(Same as MATSCI 205.) The elementary principals of x-ray, vibrational, and electron waves in solids. Basic wave behavior including Fourier analysis, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Examples of wave systems, including electromagnetic waves from Maxwell's equations. Diffracted intensity in reciprocal space and experimental techniques such as electron and x-ray diffraction. Lattice vibrations in solids, including vibrational modes, dispersion relationship, density of states, and thermal properties. Free electron model. Basic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics including Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Prerequisite: 193/203 or consent of instructor. GER:DB-EngrAppSci

4 units, Win (Clemens, B)

MATSCI 199. Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids

(Same as MATSCI 209.) The concepts of electronic energy bands and transports applied to metals, semiconductors, and insulators. The behavior of electronic and optical devices including p-n junctions, MOS-capacitors, MOSFETs, optical waveguides, quantum-well lasers, light amplifiers, and metallo-dielectric light guides. Emphasis is on relationships between structure and physical properties. Elementary quantum and statistical mechanics concepts are used. Prerequisite: 195/205 or equivalent. GER:DB-EngrAppSci

4 units, Spr (Brongersma, M)

PHYSICS 45. Light and Heat

Reflection and refraction, lenses and lens systems; polarization, interference, and diffraction; temperature, properties of matter and thermodynamics, introduction to kinetic theory of matter. Prerequisites: 41 or equivalent, and MATH 19 or 41, or consent of instructor. GER: DB-NatSci

4 units, Aut (Gratta, G), Sum (Staff)

PHYSICS 45N. Advanced Topics in Light and Heat

(F,Sem) Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. Expands on the subject matter presented in 45 to include optics and thermodynamics in everyday life, and applications from modern physics and astrophysics. Corequisite: 45 or consent of instructor.

1 unit, Aut (Chu, S)

PHYSICS 46. Light and Heat Laboratory

Pre- or corequisite: 45

1 unit, Aut (Gratta, G), Sum (Staff)

PHYSICS 50. Astronomy Laboratory and Observational Astronomy

Introduction to observational astronomy emphasizing the use of optical telescopes. Observations of stars, nebulae, and galaxies in laboratory sessions with 16- and 24-inch telescopes at the Stanford Observatory. No previous physics required. Limited enrollment. Lab. GER: DB-NatSci, DB-NatSci

3 units, Aut (Kuo, C), Sum (Staff)

Graduate Courses

APPPHYS 304. Lasers Laboratory

Theory and practice. Theoretical and descriptive background for lab experiments, detectors and noise, and lasers (helium neon, beams and resonators, argon ion, cw dye, titanium sapphire, semiconductor diode, and the Nd:YAG). Measurements of laser threshold, gain, saturation, and output power levels. Laser transverse and axial modes, linewidth and tuning, Q-switching and modelocking. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: EE 231 and 232, or consent of instructor.

4 units, Win (Byer, R)

APPPHYS 305. Advanced Nonlinear Optics Laboratory

Laser interaction with matter. Laser devices provide radiation to explore the linear and nonlinear properties of matter. Experiments on modulation, harmonic generation, parametric oscillators, modelocking, stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, coherent anti-Stokes scattering, other four-wave mixing interactions such as wavefront conjugation and optical bistability. Optical pumping and spectroscopy of atomic and molecular species. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: 304, EE 231 and 232, or consent of instructor.

4 units, Aut (Lev, B)

APPPHYS 387. Quantum Optics and Measurements

Postulates in quantum mechanics and quantum optics: Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, von Newmann's projection hypothesis, quantum non-demolition measurements, quantum states of light, cavity quantum electrodynamics, nonlocality and quantum entanglement. Second quantization of bosonic and fermionic fields; Glauber, Fock, Dicke, and Bloch states, first- and second-order coherence, quantum interference. Reservoir theory of open systems: Markoff and Born approximations, density operator master, Fokker-Planck, quantum Langevin, stochastic differential equations, quantum Monte-Carlo wavefunction method.

3 units, alternate years, not given this year

BIOE 222A. Multimodality Molecular Imaging in Living Subjects I

(Same as RAD 222A.) Instruments for imaging molecular and cellular events in animals and human beings using novel assays. Instrumentation physics, chemistry of molecular imaging probes, and applications to preclinical models and clinical disease management.

4 units, Aut (Levin, C; Moseley, M)

BIOE 222B. Multimodality Molecular Imaging in Living Subjects II

(Same as RAD 222B.) In vivo imaging techniques and applications to preclinical models and clinical disease management. Focus on cancer research, neurobiology, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal diseases.

4 units, Win (Levin, C; Moseley, M)

BIOPHYS 232. Advanced Imaging Lab in Biophysics

(Same as APPPHYS 232, BIO 132, BIO 232, MCP 232.) Laboratory and lectures. Advanced microscopy and imaging, emphasizing hands-on experience with state-of-the-art techniques. Students construct and operate working apparatus. Topics include microscope optics, Koehler illumination, contrast-generating mechanisms (bright/dark field, fluorescence, phase contrast, differential interference contrast), and resolution limits. Laboratory topics vary by year, but include single-molecule fluorescence, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical trapping. Limited enrollment. Recommended: basic physics, Biology core or equivalent, and consent of instructor.

4 units, Spr (Block, S; Schnitzer, M)

EE 234. Photonics Laboratory

Photonics and fiber optics with a focus on communication and sensing. Experimental characterization of semiconductor lasers, optical fibers, photodetectors, receiver circuitry, fiber optic links, optical amplifiers, and optical sensors. Prerequisite: 142.

3 units, Aut (Solgaard, O)

EE 236A. Modern Optics

Geometrical optics, aberrations, optical instruments, radiometry. Ray matrices and Gaussian beams. Wave nature of light. Plane waves: at interfaces, in media with varying refractive index. Diffraction and Fourier optics. Interference, single-beam interferometers (Fabry-Perot), multiple-beam interferometers (Michelson, Mach-Zehnder). Polarization, Jones and Stokes calculi. Prerequisites: EE 141 or familiarity with electromagnetism and plane waves.

3 units, Aut (Ellerbee, A)

EE 236B. Guided Waves

Maxwell's equations, constitutive relations. Kramers-Kronig relations. Modes in waveguides: slab, rectangular, circular. Photonic crystals, surface plasmon modes. General properties of waveguide modes: orthogonality, phase and group indices, group velocity dispersion. Chirped pulse propagation in dispersive media and its connection to Gaussian beam propagation. Time lens. Waveguide technologies: glass, silicon, III-V semiconductor, metallic. Waveguide devices: fibers, lasers, modulators, arrayed waveguide gratings. Scattering matrix description of passive optical devices, and constraints from energy conservation, time-reversal symmetry and reciprocity. Mode coupling, directional couplers, distributed-feedback structures. Resonators from scattering matrix and input-output perspective. Micro-ring resonators. Prerequisites: EE 236A and EE 242 or familiarity with differential form of Maxwell's equations.

3 units, Win (Fan, S)

EE 242. Electromagnetic Waves

Continuation of 141. Maxwell's equations. Plane waves in lossless and lossy media. Skin effect. Flow of electromagnetic power. Poynting's theorem. Reflection and refraction of waves at planar boundaries. Snell's law and total internal reflection. Reflection and refraction from lossy media. Guided waves. Parallel-plate and dielectric-slab waveguides. Hollow wave-guides, cavity resonators, microstrip waveguides, optical fibers. Interaction of fields with matter and particles. Antennas and radiation of electromagnetic energy. Prerequisite: 141 or PHYSICS 120.

3 units, Spr (Fraser-Smith, A)

EE 243. Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices

Semiconductor physics and optical processes in semiconductors. Operating principles and practical device features of semiconductor optoelectronic materials and heterostructures. Devices include: optical detectors (p-i-n, avalanche, and MSM); light emitting diodes; electroabsorptive modulators (Franz-Keldysh and QCSE), electrorefractive (directional couplers, Mach-Zehnder), switches (SEEDs); and lasers (waveguide and vertical cavity surface emitting). Prerequisites: semiconductor devices and solid state physics such as EE 216 and 228 or equivalents. Recommended: basic quantum mechanics and lasers such as EE 216 and 231 or equivalents.

3 units, Win (Harris, J)

EE 247. Introduction to Optical Fiber Communications

Fibers: single- and multi-mode, attenuation, modal dispersion, group-velocity dispersion, polarization-mode dispersion. Nonlinear effects in fibers: Raman, Brillouin, Kerr. Self- and cross-phase modulation, four-wave mixing. Sources: light-emitting diodes, laser diodes, transverse and longitudinal mode control, modulation, chirp, linewidth, intensity noise. Modulators: electro-optic, electro-absorption. Photodiodes: p-i-n, avalanche, responsivity, capacitance, transit time. Receivers: high-impedance, transimpedance, bandwidth, noise. Digital intensity modulation formats: non-return-to-zero, return-to-zero. Receiver performance: Q factor, bit-error ratio, sensitivity, quantum limit. Sensitivity degradations: extinction ratio, intensity noise, jitter, dispersion. Wavelength-division multiplexing. System architectures: local-area, access, metropolitan-area, long-haul. Prerequisites: 102A or 261, 242, or consent of instructor.

3 units, Aut (Kahn, J)

EE 256. Numerical Electromagnetics

Principles and applications of numerical techniques for solving practical electromagnetics problems. Time domain solutions of Maxwell's equations. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) methods. Numerical stability, dispersion, and dissipation. Absorbing boundary conditions. Perfectly matched layer methods. Explicit and implicit methods. FDTD modeling of propagation and scattering in dispersive and anisotropic media. Near-to-far-zone transformations. Computational problems require programming and use of MATLAB and other tools. Prerequisite: 242 or equivalent.

not given this year

EE 331. Biophotonics: Light in Medicine and Biology

Current topics and trends in the use of light in medicine and for advanced microscopy. Course begins with a review of relevant optical principles (basic physics required). Key topics include: light-tissue interactions; sensing and spectroscopy; contrast-enhanced imaging; super-resolution and label-free microscopy; medical applications of light for diagnostics, in-vivo imaging, and therapy; nanophotonics and array technologies. Course content enhanced through use of interactive, online tutorials.

3 units, Win (Ellerbee, A)

EE 332. Laser Dynamics

Dynamic and transient effects in lasers including spiking, Q-switching, mode locking, frequency modulation, frequency and spatial mode competition, linear and nonlinear pulse propagation, pulse shaping. Prerequisite: 236C.

3 units, Win (Fejer, M)

EE 336. Nanophotonics

(Same as MATSCI 346.) Recent developments in micro- and nanophotonic materials and devices. Basic concepts of photonic crystals. Integrated photonic circuits. Photonic crystal fibers. Superprism effects. Optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Sub-wavelength phenomena and plasmonic excitations. Meta-materials. Prerequisite: electromagnetic theory at the level of 242.

3 units, Aut (Fan, S; Brongersma, M)

EE 340. Advanced Topics in Optics and Quantum Optics

Optical microcavities and their device applications. Types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), and their electromagnetic properties, design, and fabrication techniques. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light-emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: advanced undergraduate or basic graduate-level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors.

3 units, Spr (Vuckovic, J)

EE 343. Advanced Optoelectronic Devices

Semiconductor quantum well structures; superlattices and coupled quantum wells; optical properties of quantum wells; valence band structure; effects of strain; quantum well lasers; intersubband detectors; excitons in quantum wells; absorption saturation; electroabsorption; quantum well modulators and switches. Prerequisites: 222 or equivalent quantum mechanics, 243. Recommended: 223.

3 units, not given this year

EE 345. Optical Fiber Communication Laboratory

Experimental techniques in optical fiber communications. Experimental investigation of key optical communications components including fibers, lasers, modulators, photodiodes, optical amplifiers, and WDM multiplexers and demultiplexers. Key optical communications systems techniques: eye diagrams and BER measurements. Prerequisites: undergraduate physics and optics.

3 units, Spr (Kazovsky, L)

EE 346. Introduction to Nonlinear Optics

Wave propagation in anisotropic, nonlinear, and time-varying media. Microscopic and macroscopic description of electric dipole susceptibilities. Free and forced waves-phasematching; slowly varying envelope approximation-dispersion, diffraction, space-time analogy; harmonic generation; frequency conversion; parametric amplification and oscillation; electro-optic light modulation; nonlinear processes in optical fibers. Prerequisites: 141, 242.

3 units, Spr (Harris, S)

EE 347. Optical Methods in Engineering Science

Design and understanding of modern optical systems. Topics: geometrical optics; aberration theory; systems layout; applications such as microscopes, telescopes, optical processors. Computer ray tracing program as a design tool. Prerequisite: 268 or 366, or equivalent.

3 units, not given this year

EE 348. Advanced Optical Fiber Communications

Optical amplifiers: gain, saturation, noise. Semiconductor amplifiers. Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers. System applications: preamplified receiver performance, amplifier chains. Raman amplifiers, lumped vs. distributed amplification. Group-velocity dispersion management: dispersion-compensating fibers, filters, gratings. Interaction of dispersion and nonlinearity, dispersion maps. Multichannel systems. Wavelength-division multiplexing components: filters, multiplexers. WDM systems, crosstalk. Time-, subcarrier-, code- and polarization-division multiplexing. Solitons, loss- and dispersion-managed solitons. Comparison of modulation techniques: duobinary, pulse-amplitude modulation, differential phase-shift keying, phase-shift keying, quadrature-amplitude modulation. Comparison of detection techniques: noncoherent, differentially coherent, coherent. Spectral efficiency limits. Error-control coding. Prerequisite: 247.

3 units, not given this year

EE 349. Nano Optics and Grating Photonics

Coupled wave analysis of periodic structures, gratings structures for optical communcations, wave-matter interactions with periodic media and photonic crystals, applications of periodic structures. Prerequisite: 268 or 366, or equivalent.

3 units, Win (Hesselink, L)

EE 366. Introduction to Fourier Optics

Applications of Fourier theory to the analysis and synthesis of optical imaging and optical data processing systems. Propagation and diffraction of light, Fresnel and Fraunhofer approximations, Fourier transforming properties of lenses, image formation with coherent and incoherent light, transform functions of imaging systems, optical data processing, and holography. Prerequisite: familiarity with Fourier analysis. Recommended: 261.

3 units, not given this year

EE 392B. Introduction to Imaging Sensors

Design and analysis: silicon photodetectors; CCD and CMOS passive and active sensor operation; noise and FPN analysis; spatial resolution and MTF; SNR and dynamic range; high dynamic range architectures; A/D conversion approaches. Analysis of the signal path in a digital camera starting from the optics, through the sensor, the A/D converter, to the different color processing steps. MATLAB camera simulator is used to explore various tradeoffs in camera design. Prerequisites: undergraduate level device, circuit, and system background equivalent to 102A, 101A,B; and familiarity with noise analysis.

3 units, not given this year

EE 392R. Charged Particle Optics

Electron optics of charged particle instruments including transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope and related tools, mass and energy spectrometers, electron beam lithography tools, focused ion beam systems, electron diffraction, proximal probe tools such as the scanning tunneling microscope. Topics include sources, first-order focusing of electrons and ions, third-order aberrations, space-charge effects and diffraction. Goal is to compute the optical parameters of axially-symmetric magnetic and electric lenses and to be familiar with the principles of operation of the above charged-particle systems and the factors limiting their performance. Prerequisites: undergraduate geometrical optics and vector calculus or 217.

3 units, not given this year

MATSCI 205. Waves and Diffraction in Solids

(Same as MATSCI 195.) The elementary principals of x-ray, vibrational, and electron waves in solids. Basic wave behavior including Fourier analysis, interference, diffraction, and polarization. Examples of wave systems, including electromagnetic waves from Maxwell's equations. Diffracted intensity in reciprocal space and experimental techniques such as electron and x-ray diffraction. Lattice vibrations in solids, including vibrational modes, dispersion relationship, density of states, and thermal properties. Free electron model. Basic quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics including Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics. Prerequisite: 193/203 or consent of instructor.

3 units, Win (Clemens, B)

MATSCI 209. Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids

(Same as MATSCI 199.) The concepts of electronic energy bands and transports applied to metals, semiconductors, and insulators. The behavior of electronic and optical devices including p-n junctions, MOS-capacitors, MOSFETs, optical waveguides, quantum-well lasers, light amplifiers, and metallo-dielectric light guides. Emphasis is on relationships between structure and physical properties. Elementary quantum and statistical mechanics concepts are used. Prerequisite: 195/205 or equivalent.

3 units, Spr (Brongersma, M)

MATSCI 302. Solar Cells

Theory of conventional p-n junction and excitonic solar cells. Design, fabrication, and characterization of crystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, CdTe, CIGS, and tandem and organic solar cells. Emerging solar cell concepts such as intermediate band gap and bioinspired solar cells. Emphasis is on the materials science aspects of solar cells research. Module design and economic hurdles that must be overcome for solar cell technology to generate a significant fraction of the world's electricity. Group project to explore one solar cell approach in depth. SITN/SCPD televised.

3 units, Spr (McGehee, M)

MATSCI 311. Lasers in Materials Processing

Principles of laser operation. Optically and electrically pumped lasers. Materials for solid-state lasers. Fundamentals of laser/materials interactions. Applications in thin film technology and microfabrication; laser annealing of defects and crystallization of amorphous films. Laser-induced shock waves. Extreme non-equilibrium laser processing; ultra-fast (femtosecond) lasers and their novel uses; micro- and nanofabrication of fluidic and photonic devices; intracellular nano-surgery.

3 units, Spr (Salleo, A)

MATSCI 343. Organic Semiconductors for Electronics and Photonics

The science of organic semiconductors and their use in electronic and photonic devices. Topics: methods for fabricating thin films and devices; relationship between chemical structure and molecular packing on properties such as band gap, charge carrier mobility and luminescence efficiency; doping; field-effect transistors; light-emitting diodes; lasers; biosensors; photodetectors and photovoltaic cells. SITN/SCPD televised.

3 units, Win (McGehee, M; Peumans, P)

MATSCI 346. Nanophotonics

(Same as EE 336.) Recent developments in micro- and nanophotonic materials and devices. Basic concepts of photonic crystals. Integrated photonic circuits. Photonic crystal fibers. Superprism effects. Optical properties of metallic nanostructures. Sub-wavelength phenomena and plasmonic excitations. Meta-materials. Prerequisite: electromagnetic theory at the level of 242.

3 units, Win (Fan, S; Brongersma, M)

PHYSICS 321. Laser Spectroscopy

Theoretical concepts and experimental techniques. Absorption, dispersion, Kramers-Kronig relations, line-shapes. Classical and laser linear spectroscopy. Semiclassical theory of laser atom interaction: time-dependent perturbation theory, density matrix, optical Bloch equations, coherent pulse propagation, multiphoton transitions. High-resolution nonlinear laser spectroscopy: saturation spectroscopy, polarization spectroscopy, two-photon and multiphoton spectroscopy, optical Ramsey spectroscopy. Phase conjugation. Four-wave mixing, harmonic generation. Coherent Raman spectroscopy, quantum beats, ultra-sensitive detection. Prerequisite: 230. Recommended: 231.

3 units, Spr (Kasevich, M)

PHYSICS 323. Laser Cooling and Trapping

Principles of laser cooling and atom trapping. Optical forces on atoms, forms of laser cooling, atom optics and atom interferometry, ultra-cold collisions, and introduction to Bose condensation of dilute gases. Emphasis is on the development of the general formalisms that treat these topics. Applications of the cooling and trapping techniques: atomic clocks, internal sensors, measurements that address high-energy physics questions, many-body effects, polymer science, and biology. Prerequisite: 231 or equivalent.

3 units, not given this year